Lainaus

Ihan jees liikkumisvinkkejä masentuneille

”The last time I found myself trying to hack through that mess during a particularly dark period, I started to come up with my own list of bare-bones, practical tips to help me face the idea of moving again. Now I’m sharing them, in case they might help someone else in a similar position. I stress the word “might.” If you’re depressed, the last thing you need is another a-hole telling you what you should do. But if you’re looking for somewhere to start, I’ve been there too.”

Kun kuulee jonkun antavan liikuntavinkkejä masentuneille, odottaa pahinta. Tää Sarah Kurchakin teksti on kuitenkin hyvä, ja siitä näkyy että kirjoittaja oikeesti tietää mistä kirjoittaa ja kuinka ahdistavia ne ”ulkona mieli piristyy”-heitot on.

Lue loppuun

Lainaus

Nimitysten ja lokeroiden tärkeydestä

There’s an abundance of labels these days. That’s because the Internet makes it so easy to have like call to like. In the old days, you may have been the only demisexual person in your town – but now you can find enclaves of them helping each other, informal communities answering questions. And ninety-nine times out of a hundred, it’s not that these people chose a label because it was trendy, it’s because they finally got to look around and see someone like them.

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Lainaus

”Auttajista on tullut sosiaalisen median sankareita”

Pienillä teoillakin on tietysti merkitystä. Hienoa olisi, jos niitä tehtäisiin joka päivä eikä vain juuri ennen joulua. Vielä hienompaa olisi, jos yhteiskunta tukisi ihmisiä, jotta kaikilla olisi varaa perustarpeisiin. Niin ettei teinin tarvitsisi ennen joulua toivoa ventovieraalta lahjaksi suihkusaippuaa, koska sitä ei muuten kylpyhuoneessa ole.

Hyvä joulumieli ei saa tarkoittaa sitä, että hyväosaiset keräävät vuoden tavaraa, josta ylimääräisen voi lahjoittaa jouluna pois ja unohtaa köyhät taas seuraavaksi 11 kuukaudeksi.

Lue loputkin täältä.

Lainaus

Lue tämä ja jätä ne ”triggered”-meemit jakamatta

We’re probably all guilty of using passive aggressive memes and gifs to avoid engaging in the sometimes hard (or pointless) work of meaningful dialogue, right? Someone makes an absurd comment and you realize the discussion is going nowhere, so all you can muster is an eye roll gif. I do it, too, but I reserve that for folks unabashedly trumpeting their privilege, not for injured or marginalized people discussing their pain.

Triggered wasn’t invented by whoever made the meme. It’s actually a legitimate psychological term that refers to emotions that surface in response to some stimulation that brings up a past traumatic experience.

We’re probably most familiar with triggers that result from things we read or see on a screen. Trigger warnings (or content warnings) are routinely placed on the internet before content that might be explicit or contain things that hold common triggers for people with past trauma.

Most often triggers happen to people who have PTSD, though not always. Sometimes people are able to identify their past traumatic experiences and pinpoint why they are triggered; other times, it’s a mystery. Regardless of why triggers happen, people who experience them are often able to notice patterns in the kinds of things that trigger them over time.

I, personally, experience emotional triggers that sometimes result in panic attacks. I was in my early twenties when I began having panic attacks, and because they occurred during sleep, it was quite confusing and took some time to learn what was happening.

When people think about panic attacks, they often assume something emotionally upsetting happens and then a panic attack immediately ensues. But it doesn’t always work like that. For me, an anxiety response tends to happen randomly after a buildup of triggering events over a period of time.

Learning about my triggers meant paying attention to my body and its physical responses, noting patterns, and establishing coping techniques. It’s been useful for me to learn about the things that trigger me because it allows me to control the input, or at least mitigate damage, from things I’m exposed to. [….]

Using the term “triggered” in jest is an ableist micro-aggression because it minimizes a person’s trauma, tone polices their reaction to that trauma, and thereby makes people question whether they’re overreacting. In other words, it’s gaslighting behavior.

Lue loputkin täältä.